Services | Exclusive Vehicles - Restorations

EXCLUSIVE VEHICLES - RESTORATIONS

SPECIAL PROJECTS

With custom-built vehicles, Pininfarina returns to its origins

 

Giving a new twist to its long-term artisan tradition, Pininfarina offers collectors of unique cars the possibility of creating their own ”dream car”. The Special Projects division follows up all the construction phases of these models, often raised to the status of “cult” objects.

Pininfarina has always had a natural vocation for custom-built cars. It was thanks to its exceptional capacity to interpret the clients’ dreams, creating unique or limited series, that the fame of Carrozzeria Pinin Farina spread rapidly in Italy and abroad throughout the 1930s and 40s. Over time Pininfarina’s success led to the move from an artisan to an industrial dimension, forming valuable collaboration relationships with the world’s most important car makers. But the Company’s ability to make “one-offs” for individual clients has always remained.

Today, Pininfarina continues to dedicate resources and talented people to realize unique models for individual clients. The exceptional skills of Pininfarina designers to interpret the clients’ dreams, together with the application of innovative technologies and the historic craftsmanship skills of its technicians, are still creating cars worthy of legend. Along the journey that bring these extraordinary models to life, a symbiosis grows up between the client and Pininfarina. This is a distinctive characteristic of this service because the client is the project’s real protagonist, intervening in all the phases that lead to the creation of the final custom-built car: from design to engineering, from the selection of materials to the final assembly.

In 2006 Pininfarina decided to meet the requests of two important collectors. The first was Peter Kalikow, who asked Pininfarina to design, engineer and build a special version of the Ferrari 612 Scaglietti that would accentuate the car’s lines, developing them along a stylistic path directed towards extreme elegance and exclusivity.

Jim Glickenhaus in his turn asked Pininfarina to create a unique car, based on the Ferrari Enzo and inspired by sport racing cars pushed to the extreme. Not a simple show-car, but a vehicle that could be driven on the roads. So in 2006 was born the Ferrari P4/5 by Pininfarina, a car completely designed, engineered and constructed in Pininfarina’s Cambiano factory and aerodynamically tested in the Pininfarina Wind Tunnel. At its international premiere at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, the car was the tangible proof of the transformation into reality of what just a few months before had been only Glickenhaus’s dream.

The Hyperion, a one-off custom-built car derived from the Rolls-Royce Drophead Coupe, is an opulent two-seater roadster specially designed and built for a British customer in 2008. The Hyperion takes up the legacy of other Rolls-Royces designed by Pininfarina, the Silver Dawn saloon of 1951, for example, or the Camargue coupe of 1975. The car is named after Hyperion, one of the Titans of Greek mythology, to underline its architectural and figurative power.

The dream of a collector and European Rallye Champion, Michael Stoschek, is the New Stratos, a one-off engineered and built by Pininfarina and unveiled in 2010 at the Paul Ricard Circuit of Le Castellet, France. Inspired by the Fenomenon Style Model, Pininfarina translated the original Stratos styling theme of the Bertone Stratos of the 70’s into a modern day one-off through some styling implementation and style feasibility activities. What is more, the car was tailored on Michael and Maximilian Stoschek’s technical and formal specifications.

EXCLUSIVE VEHICLES - RESTORATIONS

LANCIA AURELIA B52 PF 200 RENOVATION

The American collector Bill Pope decided to entrust the conservative restoration of his car, a Lancia Aurelia B52 PF200, to the Pininfarina Special Projects division.

A total of five examples of this model were built early in the 1950s, each one different. The car has an important place in motoring history for two reasons, one technical and the other industrial: it was the last car to be developed on floorpans supplied to the coachbuilder by the carmaker.

In the years that followed, the technical development and rising costs led to the demise of custom-built coachworks and, for Pininfarina in particular, the decision to take the giant step of industrialising the workshops and building the Grugliasco plant to produce the Giulietta Spider.